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What is declarative imperative exclamatory interrogative?

What is declarative imperative exclamatory interrogative?

A declarative sentence makes a statement and ends with a period. Examples: I go to Voorhees Middle School. George Washington was the first president. An imperative sentence gives a command or makes a request. An interrogative sentence asks a question and ends with a question mark.

What is the 4 types of sentences?

There are four types of sentences: declarative, imperative, interrogative, and exclamatory.

What are the elements of sentence?

The subject and predicate make up the two basic structural parts of any complete sentence. In addition, there are other elements, contained within the subject or predicate, that add meaning or detail. These elements include the direct object, indirect object, and subject complement.

What does every sentence end with?

You have three options for punctuating the end of a sentence: a period, an exclamation mark, or a question mark. Each one sets a different tone for the whole sentence: that of a statement, an outcry, or a question, respectively. An exclamation point is used to show excitement or emphasis. …

Does a simile use like or as?

Similes use the words like or as to compare things—“Life is like a box of chocolates.” In contrast, metaphors directly state a comparison—“Love is a battlefield.”

Is as if a simile?

The above patterns of simile are the most common, but there are others made with adverbs or words such as than and as if, for example: He ran as fast as the wind. He is larger than life. They ran as if for their lives.

What is simile give example?

Similes. A simile is a phrase that uses a comparison to describe. For example, “life” can be described as similar to “a box of chocolates.” You know you’ve spotted one when you see the words like or as in a comparison. Similes are like metaphors.

What can I say instead of as if?

apparently

  • allegedly.
  • as if.
  • as though.
  • at a glance.
  • at first sight.
  • in all likelihood.
  • intuitively.
  • it appears that.

What can I say instead of I think?

Ways to Say I THINK

In my opinion… I believe…
To my mind… It is my view…
As far as I’m concerned… It’s my belief that…
The way I see things is that… I honestly believe that…
As I see it… To my way of thinking…

What can I say instead of this shows?

What is another word for this shows?

this confirms this demonstrates
this establishes this explains
this exposes this indicates
this proves this reveals
this supports this validates