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What happens to the calcium carbonate calcite skeletons and shells of small organisms as they descend to deep depths of the ocean?

Table of Contents
  1. What happens to the calcium carbonate calcite skeletons and shells of small organisms as they descend to deep depths of the ocean?
  2. What happens below the calcium carbonate compensation depth?
  3. What affects the depth of the carbonate compensation depth?
  4. What happens to calcium carbonate below the CCD that is different from what happens above the CCD?
  5. Why is CCD deeper in Atlantic?
  6. Is the CCD deeper in cold water?
  7. What does an increase in Co₂ do to the pH of ocean water?
  8. Why is there a sharp reduction in calcium carbonate below a certain depth in both oceans?
  9. How are oozes different from abyssal clays?
  10. Is abyssal clay Lithogenous?
  11. Why are siliceous oozes and abyssal clays more common in deep ocean basins?
  12. What are the slowest growing Hydrogenous sediments?
  13. What are two types of Hydrogenous nodules?
  14. Which of the following is the most abundant sediment in Neritic deposits?
  15. What are three types of ocean floor sediments?
  16. What is the most common sediment?
  17. What material is at the bottom of the ocean?
  18. What is sea floor spreading?
  19. What is the importance of seafloor spreading?
  20. Which is the best evidence supporting the concept of ocean floor spreading?
  21. Which of the following is not evidence of sea-floor spreading?
  22. What does seafloor spreading look like?
  23. Which of the following is an evidence of seafloor spreading?
  24. What are the steps in the process of seafloor spreading?
  25. What are the three steps in seafloor spreading?
  26. What is the first step in seafloor spreading?
  27. What are the features of seafloor?
  28. What two main features are formed from seafloor spreading?
  29. Why do you think it would be important to know what the seafloor looks like?
  30. What is the seafloor called?

What happens to the calcium carbonate calcite skeletons and shells of small organisms as they descend to deep depths of the ocean?

Carbonate compensation depth, of course, only refers to the former; more on silica later. When CaCO3-shelled organisms die, their skeletal remains begin sinking towards the bottom of the ocean. This creates a calcareous ooze that can, under pressure from the overlying water, form limestone or chalk.

What happens below the calcium carbonate compensation depth?

When these shells fall below a certain water depth, they begin to dissolve as ocean waters become undersaturated with respect to calcium carbonate because of increasing pressure, decreasing temperature and increasing amounts of dissolved CO2. With increasing depth, the rate of dissolution increases.

What affects the depth of the carbonate compensation depth?

Factors that affect the depth of the lysocline and the compensation depth include: Water temperature. Depth. CO 2 concentration. pH (high pH values aid in carbonate preservation)

What happens to calcium carbonate below the CCD that is different from what happens above the CCD?

If the sea bed is above the CCD, bottom sediments can consist of calcareous sediments called calcareous ooze, which is essentially a type of limestone or chalk. If the exposed sea bed is below the CCD tiny shells of CaCO3 will dissolve before reaching this level, preventing deposition of carbonate sediment.

Why is CCD deeper in Atlantic?

Specifically, the CCD is deeper in the Atlantic (~5,000 m) than in the Pacific and Indian (~3,500–4,500 m) due to a lower saturation state in the subsurface Pacific and Indian as a result of higher total CO2 concentrations from organic matter remineralization.

Is the CCD deeper in cold water?

Carbon dioxide dissolves easily in cold water, so CaCO3 will dissolve in cold water. The calcite compensation depth (CCD) is the depth in the oceans where the rate of calcium carbonate material forming and sinking is equal with the rate the material is dissolving.

What does an increase in Co₂ do to the pH of ocean water?

Because of human-driven increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, there is more CO2 dissolving into the ocean. The ocean’s average pH is now around 8.1 , which is basic (or alkaline), but as the ocean continues to absorb more CO2, the pH decreases and the ocean becomes more acidic.

Why is there a sharp reduction in calcium carbonate below a certain depth in both oceans?

LAB-3 1. (b) The sharp reduction in calcium carbonate below a depth of about 4000 meters in ocean A is due to increase carbonate dissolution. Carbonate dissolution results from the corrosiveness of seawater, which increases as temperature decreases, pressure increases and carbonate-ion content decreases.

How are oozes different from abyssal clays?

How are oozes different from abyssal clays? Oozes are atleast 30% biogeneous test material while abyssal clays are at least 70% fine clay sized particles from the continent. By volume much more ooze than abyssal clays exist on the ocean floor.

Is abyssal clay Lithogenous?

Lithogenous sediments (lithos = rock, generare = to produce) are sediments derived from erosion of rocks on the continents. When these tiny particles settle in areas where little other material is being deposited (usually in the deep-ocean basins far from land), they form a sediment called abyssal clay.

Why are siliceous oozes and abyssal clays more common in deep ocean basins?

Areas of the ocean that lie beneath the carbonate compensation depth (CCD), below which calcium carbonate dissolves, typically beneath 4-5 km, will be dominated by siliceous ooze because calcium-carbonate-based material would dissolve in these regions.

What are the slowest growing Hydrogenous sediments?

The slowest growing hydrogenous sediments are manganese nodules.

What are two types of Hydrogenous nodules?

Several types have been identified: hydrogenous—formed from seawater; diagenetic—formed as a result of diagenetic redox reactions in sediments; and hydrothermal—formed in association with geochemical processes associated with hydrothermal circulation through the mid-ocean ridge system.

Which of the following is the most abundant sediment in Neritic deposits?

Terrigenous sediments are the most abundant. As the name implies, terrigenous sediment originates on the continents or islands near them. They are carried to the ocean in rivers and streams, or by winds as blowing dust, and dominate the continental margins, abyssal plains, and polar ocean floors.

What are three types of ocean floor sediments?

There are three kinds of sea floor sediment: terrigenous, pelagic, and hydrogenous. Terrigenous sediment is derived from land and usually deposited on the continental shelf, continental rise, and abyssal plain.

What is the most common sediment?

1) Terrigenous Sediments: These sediments originate from the continents from erosion, volcanism and wind transported material. These are the most abundant sediments.

What material is at the bottom of the ocean?

Terrogenous ocean bottoms consist of materials like rock, sand and mud. Terrogenous bottoms come from Earth’s crust. These bottoms can be solid rock, or the products from weathering and erosion of this rock.

What is sea floor spreading?

Sea-floor spreading is what happens at the mid-oceanic ridge where a divergent boundary is causing two plates to move away from one another resulting in spreading of the sea floor. As the plates move apart, new material wells up and cools onto the edge of the plates.

What is the importance of seafloor spreading?

Significance. Seafloor spreading helps explain continental drift in the theory of plate tectonics. When oceanic plates diverge, tensional stress causes fractures to occur in the lithosphere.

Which is the best evidence supporting the concept of ocean floor spreading?

Abundant evidence supports the major contentions of the seafloor-spreading theory. First, samples of the deep ocean floor show that basaltic oceanic crust and overlying sediment become progressively younger as the mid-ocean ridge is approached, and the sediment cover is thinner near the ridge.

Which of the following is not evidence of sea-floor spreading?

Your answer: The distribution of ice sheets across the planet is not an evidence of sea-floor spreading.

What does seafloor spreading look like?

The continual process of seafloor spreading separated the stripes in an orderly pattern. Oceanic crust slowly moves away from mid-ocean ridges and sites of seafloor spreading. As it moves, it becomes cooler, more dense, and more thick.

Which of the following is an evidence of seafloor spreading?

Several types of evidence supported Hess’s theory of sea-floor spreading: eruptions of molten material, magnetic stripes in the rock of the ocean floor, and the ages of the rocks themselves.

What are the steps in the process of seafloor spreading?

What are the 4 steps of seafloor spreading?

  1. Magma comes out of the rift valley.
  2. Magma cools to rock and hardens.
  3. Rock is pushed away as new rock is formed at MOR.
  4. Oceanic crust and continental crust meet at the trench.
  5. Oceanic crust bends down under the continental crust.
  6. Gravity pulls rock towards mantle.

What are the three steps in seafloor spreading?

Terms in this set (7)

  • Magma comes out of the rift valley.
  • Magma cools to rock and hardens.
  • Rock is pushed away as new rock is formed at MOR.
  • Oceanic crust and continental crust meet at the trench.
  • Oceanic crust bends down under the continental crust.
  • Gravity pulls rock towards mantle.
  • Rock melts to mantle.

What is the first step in seafloor spreading?

1. A long crack in the oceanic crust forms at a mid ocean ridge. 2. Molten material rises and erupts along the ridge.

What are the features of seafloor?

Features of the ocean include the continental shelf, slope, and rise. The ocean floor is called the abyssal plain. Below the ocean floor, there are a few small deeper areas called ocean trenches. Features rising up from the ocean floor include seamounts, volcanic islands and the mid-oceanic ridges and rises.

What two main features are formed from seafloor spreading?

Midocean ridges, transform faults and fracture zones are the key surface features produced by seafloor spreading.

Why do you think it would be important to know what the seafloor looks like?

Sea floor sediment provide an invaluable key to past climate change. Finely varved sediments from areas of rapid deposition provide a high-resolution record of past climate variation, and volcanic ash layers contribute to the comprehensive study of climate change on relatively short timescales.

What is the seafloor called?

seabed