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What does Mercutio say to Romeo before he died?

What does Mercutio say to Romeo before he died?

Mercutio’s final line before his death is; Help me into some house, Benvolio, Or I shall faint. A plague o’ both your houses!

Which line in this excerpt from Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet foreshadow the tragic ending of the play?

Answer: The line in this excerpt from Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet that foreshadow the tragic fate of Romeo and Juliet is the third one: “Then love-devouring death do what he dare;”.

How is Romeo loyal to Mercutio?

Mercutio is loyal when Romeo refuses to fight Tybalt, as he decides to fight Tybalt instead. This is because he cannot stand to see Romeo’s honour jeopardised in the face of his enemy.

What are two central ideas of the excerpt Romeo and Juliet?

In this excerpt from Act III, Scene I of Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet”, the two central ideas are Romeo blames falling in love with Juliet as the cause of Mercutio’s death and Romeo blames his own cowardice and refusal to fight as the cause of Mercutio’s death. Tybalt calls Romeo a villain.

Which figure of speech is used in this excerpt from Act 1 of Romeo and Juliet?

metaphors

What does Oh she doth teach the torches to burn bright mean?

O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright! ( Act 1, Scene 5) Basically, with this line Romeo is saying that Juliet is so beautiful that her beauty is brighter than a torch. She is so bright, that the torches learn to be bright from her. It is another metaphor on Juliet’s beauty.

Is O she doth teach the torches to burn bright a metaphor?

Thus a metaphor proceeds by ascribing to a given object certain actions or qualities which are not literally true of that object, and which have in reference to it only the truth of analogy. “O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright! in these lines we have four pure and perfect metaphors.

What type of figurative language is O she doth teach the torches to burn bright?

Simile

Who teach the torches to burn bright?

William Shakespeare. When Romeo initially sees Juliet, he compares her immediately to the brilliant light of the torches and tapers that illuminate Capulet’s great hall: ” O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!” (1.4. 46). Juliet is the light that frees him from the darkness of his perpetual melancholia.

What does beauty too rich for use mean?

” Romeo’s first appraisal of Juliet’s beauty is rich in images. Hers is a “beauty rich for use, for earth too dear!” These words contain dramatic irony since Juliet’s beauty is too rich for use in the sense that it will be laid in the tomb too early, and this also foreshadows the tragedy.

What Does It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night mean?

Shakespeare: It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night. No Fear: She stands out against the darkness. Shakespeare: Like a rich jewel in an Ethiope’s ear, No Fear: like a jeweled earring hanging against the cheek of an African. Shakespeare: Beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear.

Did my heart love till now forswear it sight for I ne’er saw true beauty till this night Romeo and Juliet?

When you forswear, you abandon something completely. In Romeo and Juliet, Romeo is at first smitten by the maiden Rosaline, but once he lays eyes on Juliet, Rosaline is history. He says of Juliet, “Did my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight, for I ne’er saw true beauty till this night.”

Who first recognizes Romeo?

Friar Lawrence

What did Romeo say about Juliet?

Romeo initially describes Juliet as a source of light, like a star, against the darkness: “she doth teach the torches to burn bright! It seems she hangs upon the cheek of night.” As the play progresses, a cloak of interwoven light and dark images is cast around the pair.