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How do you use thus as a conjunction?

How do you use thus as a conjunction?

When two independent clauses are joined by “thus” “Thus” is a conjunctive adverb. This means that it can act like a coordinating conjunction in joining two sentences. Remember, a coordinating conjunction is a word like “and,” “but,” or “or” that joins two independent clauses or complete sentences to make one sentence.

Is thus a conjunctive adverb?

A conjunctive adverb is not so common in everyday speech, but occurs frequently in written prose. These include the following: however, moreover, therefore, thus, consequently, furthermore, unfortunately. But remember that conjunctive adverbs can be used in any part of a sentence.

How do you use thus in a sentence?

Use the adverb thus in place of words like therefore or so when you want to sound proper. Use thus interchangeably with words like consequently, ergo, hence, and just like that. For example, if you want to sound fancy you could say no one showed up for water aerobics, thus the class was cancelled. It had to be thus.

Do you need a comma after thus?

“Thus” is usually separated from the rest of the sentence by commas, but the commas are often omitted if this would lead to three commas in a row (as in the third example). The comma here was appropriate because what follows “thus” is not a clause. It is just a parenthetical expression extending the preceding clause.

What can I say instead of thus?

Synonyms of thus

  • accordingly,
  • consequently,
  • ergo,
  • hence,
  • so,
  • therefore,
  • thereupon,
  • wherefore.

What can I use instead of in order to?

What is another word for in order to?

to so as to
as a means to for the purpose of
that one may that it would be possible to
with the aim of in order to achieve
so as to achieve for

Is it OK to use thus?

“Thus” is common in academic and formal writing. The proper way to use it is at the beginning of a sentence or after a semi-colon (;) and to have a comma after it. For example, “Sugar has been shown to increase weight gain; thus, it ought to be avoided.” I recommend using it only once in an essay.

Can you use therefore and thus in the same sentence?

Therefore is common in mathematical proofs. Hence and thus have the same basic meaning and are often interchangeable. However, there is a slight difference. Hence usually refers to the future.

How do you end a sentence with thus?

When thus means “therefore”, it normally shouldn’t be at the end. In that sense, it can often be replaced with hence. When it means “in this manner”, it’s perfectly fine at the end.

Is hence why correct English?

But another sense of the word “hence” (“therefore”) causes more trouble because writers often add “why” to it: “I got tired of mowing the lawn, hence why I bought the goat.” “Hence” and “why” serve the same function in a sentence like this; use just one or the other, not both: “hence I bought the goat” or “that’s why I …

Does hence require a comma?

Like its meaning and general usage in sentences, there is also no standard rule on using commas with “hence”. Generally, “hence” has a comma before it.

What is the difference between Hence and henceforth?

As adverbs the difference between henceforth and hence is that henceforth is (formal) from now on; from this time on while hence is (archaic) from here, from this place, away.

Does hence mean therefore?

The difference between Hence and Therefore When used as adverbs, hence means from here, from this place, away, whereas therefore means for that or this purpose, referring to something previously stated. Hence is also interjection with the meaning: go away!

Is henceforth correct?

‘Henceforth’ is a time reference and should not be used to mean ‘because’ or to mean ‘in this document only. ‘ ‘Henceforth’ is rarely used in speaking and is primarily used in legal or formal documents.

Who and which sentences?

A who/which clause cannot stand alone as a complete sentence. Moms: The “who/which” clause is one of several kinds of dependent clauses. This one is an adjective clause because the entire clause describes a noun and therefore follows a noun. Grammar Rule #10: The who/which clause is usually set off by commas.

Are Who and that interchangeable?

There are many conflicting online sources when it comes to determining whether to use “who” or “that” in a sentence. However, one rule is absolutely clear: “Who” should be used only when referring to people. “That” can be used for referring to people and objects/subjects.

Who vs which animals?

The Associated Press Stylebook (AP style) says that animals with names should be referred to as who, while animals without names should be referred to as that or which.

Can I use it for animals?

A: It’s not often we get grammar questions about animals—it’s even less often that we get one with two different answers. An animal is referred as “it” unless the relationship is personal (like a pet that has a name). Then it’s OK to use “he” or “she” when referring to the animal.

Which pronoun is used for lion?

Usually we use “it” for animals. but here for lion and lioness we should say “he” and “she”.

Does who only refer to people?

Although in general grammar it’s not a hard-and-fast rule that you must use “who” to refer to people, certain style guides do require it. For example, if you’re following APA style, you are required to use “who” and not “that” to refer to humans.

When you are referring to a person you always use this word?

The Associated Press Stylebook recommends this approach: Use who to refer to “human beings and to animals with a name”; use that to refer to “inanimate objects and to animals without a name.”

What is the difference between which and that?

“That” is used to indicate a specific object, item, person, condition, etc., while “which” is used to add information to objects, items, people, situations, etc. Because “which” indicates a non-restrictive (optional) clause, it is usually set off by commas before “which” and at the end of the clause.

Can which be used for a person?

Using “Which,” “Who,” and “That” “Who” is used for people. “Which” is used for things, and “that” can be used for either. (Note, however, that using “that” for people is considered informal.)